Understanding patterns and correlates of daily pain using the Sickle cell disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART)

Understanding patterns and correlates of daily pain using the Sickle cell disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART)

Patients with sickle cell disease have a lifelong blood disorder complicated by chronic pain. A mobile app was developed to remotely monitor patients at Duke, Vanderbilt, and the University of Pittsburgh. Patients used the app for an average of 164 days and analysis of pain throughout the day found clusters of more severe pain reports at specific times of day and higher pain scores in subsets of patients.

Like other remote symptom-reporting tools (Whitehead & Seaton, 2016), app use was more frequent at the beginning of the reporting period and then decreased over time. Further, there were significant individual differences in the frequency of reporting, with several individuals reporting fewer than five times and others reporting nearly every day. Despite a limited sample size (N=47), this study provides strong evidence supporting the use of mobile technology for measuring daily pain and symptoms in Sickle Cell Disease.

Jonassaint CR, Kang C, Abrams DM, Li JJ, Mao J, Jia Y, Long Q, Sanger M, Jonassaint JC, De Castro L, Shah N. Understanding patterns and correlates of daily pain using the Sickle cell disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART). Br J Haematol. 2017 Oct 26. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14956.

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